Videos

The Azim Premji University regularly organizes seminars, webinars and colloquium lectures involving members of the faculty as well as academicians, activists, artists and other distinguished personalities from a wide array of fields. This section consists of video recordings of  major events conducted at the Azim Premji University.

The Media Meltdown: Can it be Stemmed?

Ammu Joseph

22/09/2017

About the Lecture

The shocking and tragic assassination of Gauri Lankesh serves as a grim reminder of the grave and present threats to freedom of expression (of which media freedom is a part) in general and the dangers faced by individual journalists attempting to speak truth to power in particular. However, there are a number of other ongoing, insidious challenges to media freedom and independent journalism that may not be very obvious to even those members of the public who follow the news in print, on television or online. Yet media freedom is an essential part of democracy, a prerequisite if citizens are to enjoy their rights to freedom of expression and information. So what ails the media today should be of concern to everyone who would like India to remain a functioning democracy.  It is time more citizens became aware that they have a stake in media freedom.

About Speaker

Ammu Joseph is an independent journalist and author based in Bangalore, writing primarily on issues relating to gender, human development, the media, and culture. With degrees in English Literature (Madras University) and Public Communications (Syracuse University), she began her career with Eve's Weekly in Mumbai/Bombay in 1977. In her last full-time job within the press, she was editor of the Sunday magazine of The Indian Post, Mumbai. Her publications include six books (a few of which are co-authored): Whose News? The Media and Women's Issues, Women in Journalism: Making News, Storylines: Conversations with Women Writers, Just Between Us: Women Speak about their Writing, Interior Decoration: Poems by 54 Women in 10 Languages and Terror, Counter-Terror: Women Speak Out.  She has contributed to several other books and publications, both Indian and international, including several UNESCO documents. She received the UNFPA-LAADLI Media Award for Gender Sensitivity in 2007 "in recognition of her consistent engagement with gender issues." In 2003 she received the Donna Allen Award for Feminist Advocacy from the AEJMC, USA. She has been on the visiting faculty of several institutions of media education and is a founder-member of the Network of Women in Media, India as well as media Watch Bengaluru.

Bovine Politics

Dr. Sagari R Ramdas

15/09/2017

About the Lecture

The year 2017 until now has witnessed the highest number of incidents of lynching in the name of cow –protection, than ever before. The violent bans on cattle slaughter and inter-state cattle transportation, the drive to shut-down slaughterhouses in the name of 'illegality' and recent rules under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, to criminalise the sale of animals for slaughter in animal markets nationwide, are not only Anti-Cow but Anti-Farmer as well. These skewed directives of the state, deprive farmers of any resale value for non-productive cattle, which are not bought by another farmer. This resale value exists because of all post-farm downstream economic values of the cattle economy post-slaughter: cattle beef as a critical part of food cultures and a cheap source of protein, cattle skin the basis of India’s thriving leather industry, and other offal used in manufacturing. The sale of non-productive stock enables farmers to procure replacement animals to sustain their dairy and draught-based livelihoods. Bans forcing the closure of these post-farm economies are driving declining cattle populations, and livelihood loss for millions. The cow can only be saved by withdrawing all bans on beef consumption, cattle slaughter, trade of animals for slaughter, inter-state transportation of cattle, along with pro-active strategies to protect the ecological cultures that sustain India’s bovine economy.

About Speaker

Sagari Ramdas is a veterinary scientist, a member of the Food Sovereignty Alliance, India, and learning to be an agro-ecological food farmer. She is a popular educator with social movements in the areas of women and food sovereignty, Adivasis, indigenous resilience and Buen Vivir and agro-ecological livestock production in the context of Food Sovereignty and Climate Change. She has published widely on gender, ecological governance, and resistance struggles. She is involved in developing a Community Learning Centre in Telangana, India (https://www.facebook.com/kudali.centre/)

The Food Sovereignty Alliance is a solidarity platform of adivasi, dalit, pastoralist, landless, small and marginal farmer social movements and co-producers, working towards a common vision of food sovereignty, in defence of peoples sovereign rights to food and the rights of mother earth (http://foodsovereigntyalliance.wordpress.com/)

Governance of Nature Conservation in India

Ranjitsinh Jhala

28/08/2017

About the Lecture

Despite heavy pressures of population, poverty and land hunger, India has lost only one large mammalian species in the peninsula and plains: the cheetah. In 1947, we had greater advantages in the conservation field than other developing nations. We squandered them.

The conservation imperative here has always flowed from the top echelons. In British and princely India, it was shikar that prompted wildlife protection and there was more wildlife inthose states where the ruler hunted than in those where he did not. After independence, natureconservation depended upon the personal interest of the prime minister. It is men, not money, which matters most in conservation.

Nature and the natural heritage of the nation has hope of survival only in our effectively managed protected areas. These at least should be sacrosanct, like the embodiments of our cultural heritage such as Ajanta, Halebid and others. Conservation and economic development are not necessarily the antithesis of each other. Conservation, as good governance, is a compromise, the art of the possible, but there have to be rubicons which the government must not cross. There are a number of species now close to extinction and unlike the cheetah, we have the wherewithal to save them. So if any species now goes extinct, it would be deemed as allowed to go extinct.

About Speaker

Dr. Ranjitsinh Jhala has more than five decades of experience in wildlife conservation in India. As a member of the Indian Administrative Service, he was instrumental in drafting the Wildlife (Protection) Act 1972, the first comprehensive nationwide legislation that has been the basis for wildlife conservation in India. He has held several key posts such as Member Secretary of the task force for formulating Project Tiger, Director Wildlife Preservation and additional secretary in the Ministry of Environment and Forests.  His efforts have led to the conservation of several endangered species, and an eastern subspecies of the barasingha is even named after him. Recognition of his work on has also come in the form of several awards including the Order of the Golden Ark awarded by Netherlands in 1979.  He is the author of several publications as well as books. His most recent book, “A Life with Wildlife: From Princely India to the Present” (Harper Collins, 2017) is a first-hand, insider's chronicle of the history of wildlife conservation.

New Trends in the Indian Documentary

Meenakshi Shedde

18/08/2017

About the Lecture

The talk gives a brief history of documentaries, both Indian and foreign, on India. It will discuss how the Indian documentary has evolved into a lively contemporary tool for art, debate and activism and is experimenting with a variety of form such as the autobiographical, docu-fiction and mockumentaries that incorporporate fiction and surrealism. It will explore powerful documentaries from India made on a range of socio-political issues, including gender, caste, sexuality and human rights.

About Speaker

Meenakshi Shedde is South Asia Consultant to the Berlin and Dubai International Film Festivals, based in Mumbai. She is Guest Curator, British Film Institute, UK, for India On Film. Winner of India’s National Award for Best Film Critic, she has been on the jury of 20 international film festivals, including Cannes, Berlin and Venice. She has been India/Asia Curator/Consultant since 20 years to the Berlin, Toronto, Locarno, Busan, Dubai, IFFI-Goa, Kerala, Mumbai and Colombo Film Festivals. Her articles have appeared in Variety, Screen International, Film Comment, Sight & Sound, Cahiers du Cinema and Midday. She has taught and lectured on cinema and has been a mentor on Film Critics’ Labs and Scriptwriting Labs.

Education for a Changing India

Kartikeya Sarabhai

17/08/2017

About the Lecture

While the world is rapidly changing, the basic institutions of formal learning, schools and colleges, have remained relatively in the same mould over the years.  Today, in many sectors, we see dramatic changes happening.  Learning itself has become multi-sourced and children have access to information and communication like never before.  New models of sharing are coming up.  The environmental crisis is much more recognized today and requires new skills and values to be inculcated.  Violence in the world has reached new levels and calls for a relook at some of our basic educational approaches.  

CEE has been engaged in working with several new approaches including ones which were part of the Education for Sustainable Development UNESCO decade.  The talk will discuss these approaches and how they could be mainstreamed in the Indian Educational System.

About Speaker

Kartikeya Sarabhai is one of the world's leading environmental educators and a dedicated community builder. He was educated in Cambridge (Tripos in Natural Science) and went on to do post graduate work in development communication at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Mr. Sarabhai is the founder director of the Centre for Environment Education headquartered in Ahmedabad, with 40 offices across India. A member of many committees set up by the Government of India and other organizations, Mr. Sarabhai’s primary focus is on the greening of India's formal education system, and initiatives for biodiversity education. Mr.Sarabhai is a member of the Earth Charter International Council and the chairholder of the UNESCO Chair on Education for Sustainable Development and the Human Habitat. Editor of the Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, published by SAGE, Mr.Sarabhai has written and spoken extensively on environment and related subjects in national and international forums. Recipient of Tree of Learning Award (1998) from the IUCN in for his contributions for environmental education, the Indian Institute of Human Rights has presented him with the World Human Rights Promotion Award in 2005. In 2012 the President of India conferred him with Padma Shri, one of India’s highest civilian awards. 

Where India Goes: Abandoned Toilets, Stunted Developments and the Costs of Caste

Dean Spears

03/08/2017

About the Lecture

Where India Goes addresses the questions: Why are children in India shorter, on average, than   poorer children in sub-Saharan Africa? Why are Muslims in India more likely to survive childhood than Hindus?

Above all, why is open defecation so persistently, stubbornly high in rural India — and what can be done to accelerate the switch to the sort of health-promoting latrines which are widely used in the rest of the developing world?  In their book, Coffey and Spears develop evidence that poor sanitation is an important determinant of the poor health outcomes of India’s children, and that the continuing relevance of the purity, pollution, and untouchability norms of the caste system keeps open defecation alive today despite decades of government latrine construction programs.  The book takes the reader on a tour through Indian villages, survey statistics, and government offices — ultimately, inviting the reader to join in thinking about the crucial open policy question: in a context where poor health is so enduringly tied to social inequality, what can state programs and policies do to help?

About Speaker

Dean Spears is an Assistant Professor of Economics at UT Austin, where he is an affiliate of the Population Research Center, and is a visiting economist at the Indian Statistical Institute in Delhi. He earned his Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University. He is a development economist and economic demographer who studies early-life health and human capital formation, environmental economics, and population.

Diane Coffey and Dean Spears co-founded and co-direct a research non-profit called r.i.c.e., a research institute for compassionate economics, which works towards evidence-based policy for child health and human development in India.

How to think about the role of power in the social sciences-Part 1

Amit Bhaduri

26/07/2017

About the Lecture

The Social Sciences deal with the exercise of power in economy, society, polity and even culture, but have different views about its origin and its effect. No coherent systematic analysis connecting different fields exists. Is this not possible? If so, why not? And if this is possible, then what is the way forward? The talk will probe such questions and offer some tentative suggestions.

About Speaker

Educated in Presidency College, Calcutta, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, U.S.A and Cambridge University, U.K, Amit Bhaduri received his Ph.D. from Cambridge University, UK in 1967. He has taught in various universities around the world as Professor/Visiting Professor. These include Presidency College, Calcutta, Indian Institute of Management, Calcutta, Delhi school of Economics, Delhi and Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi, Centre for Development Studies, Trivandrum, El Colegio de Mexico, Stanford University, U.S.A, Vienna and Linz University, Austria, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Bremen University, Germany, and Bologna and Pavia University, Italy. He has also been a Fellow of various Institutes of Advanced Studies in Austria, Sweden, Germany and Italy, worked on various expert bodies of the United Nations, and served as Member on some national and international commissions. He has published more than seventy papers in standard international journals and is currently on the editorial boards of five. He has written eight books: The Economic Structure of Backward Agriculture (London, Academic Press, 1982); Macroeconomics: the Dynamics of Commodity Production (London, Macmillan, 1986); Unconventional Economic Essays (Delhi, Oxford University Press, 1993); An Intelligent Person’s Guide to Liberalisation (Delhi, Penguin India, 1996), (co-authored with Deepak Nayyar);On The Border of Economic Theory and History (Delhi, Oxford University Press, 1993); Development with Dignity (Delhi, National Book Trust, 2005); Employment and Development (Delhi, Oxford University Press, 2006); and The Face You Were Afraid to See (Delhi, Penguin India, 2009). Several of his books and articles have been translated into several European and Asian languages.

Amit Bhaduri was internationally selected Professor (of ‘Clear Fame’) in Pavia University, Italy until 2009, and is currently Professor Emeritus, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, and also Visiting Professor in the Council for Social Development, New Delhi.  Amit Bhaduri has been awarded the Leontief Prize, Global Development and Environment, Tufts University (2016), USA., the Indian Council Of Social Science Research Prize in Economics, (1985) and the Stevenson Prize for the best piece of Ph.D. Research in Economics (1967).

How to think about the role of power in the social sciences-Part 2

Amit Bhaduri

26/07/2017

About the Lecture

The Social Sciences deal with the exercise of power in economy, society, polity and even culture, but have different views about its origin and its effect. No coherent systematic analysis connecting different fields exists. Is this not possible? If so, why not? And if this is possible, then what is the way forward? The talk will probe such questions and offer some tentative suggestions.

About Speaker

Educated in Presidency College, Calcutta, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, U.S.A and Cambridge University, U.K, Amit Bhaduri received his Ph.D. from Cambridge University, UK in 1967. He has taught in various universities around the world as Professor/Visiting Professor. These include Presidency College, Calcutta, Indian Institute of Management, Calcutta, Delhi school of Economics, Delhi and Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi, Centre for Development Studies, Trivandrum, El Colegio de Mexico, Stanford University, U.S.A, Vienna and Linz University, Austria, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Bremen University, Germany, and Bologna and Pavia University, Italy. He has also been a Fellow of various Institutes of Advanced Studies in Austria, Sweden, Germany and Italy, worked on various expert bodies of the United Nations, and served as Member on some national and international commissions. He has published more than seventy papers in standard international journals and is currently on the editorial boards of five. He has written eight books: The Economic Structure of Backward Agriculture (London, Academic Press, 1982); Macroeconomics: the Dynamics of Commodity Production (London, Macmillan, 1986); Unconventional Economic Essays (Delhi, Oxford University Press, 1993); An Intelligent Person’s Guide to Liberalisation (Delhi, Penguin India, 1996), (co-authored with Deepak Nayyar);On The Border of Economic Theory and History (Delhi, Oxford University Press, 1993); Development with Dignity (Delhi, National Book Trust, 2005); Employment and Development (Delhi, Oxford University Press, 2006); and The Face You Were Afraid to See (Delhi, Penguin India, 2009). Several of his books and articles have been translated into several European and Asian languages.

Amit Bhaduri was internationally selected Professor (of ‘Clear Fame’) in Pavia University, Italy until 2009, and is currently Professor Emeritus, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, and also Visiting Professor in the Council for Social Development, New Delhi.  Amit Bhaduri has been awarded the Leontief Prize, Global Development and Environment, Tufts University (2016), USA., the Indian Council Of Social Science Research Prize in Economics, (1985) and the Stevenson Prize for the best piece of Ph.D. Research in Economics (1967).

Inclusive Community Development

Girija Satish

21/07/2017

About the Lecture

This talk will discuss how Nav Bharat Jagriti Kendra (NBJK), a non-profit organization, came to be founded in 1974, in the wake of Vinoba Bhave’s Bhudan Andolan and Jai Prakash Narayan’s Sampurna Kranti and its journey since then. NBJK has sought to instill an urge for change and community initiative among people. Working with the ideal of integrated development, NBJK has challenged the complex issues of community, poverty, livelihood, health, education, governance, human rights and continually sought to empower all for sustainable development. It has challenged the exclusive approach of development and formed Lok Samhiti, a voluntary group for decentralised governance across Bihar and Jharkhand and have reached to a million population.

About Speaker

Girija Satish is an engineer of 70s. Motivated by the philosophy of Gandhi and JP Narayan, he left his Public Sector Job and along with his three engineer friends, pledged to work for community development. In the process he set up a NGO, named Nav Bharat Jagriti Kendra in 1974. NBJK is one of the prominent organisations of Bihar / Jharkhand and reaches out to almost a million people in need, directly and indirectly. 

Making Sense of the Jat Agitations

Kalaiyarasan A

05/05/2017

About the Lecture

The recent protest by the Jats for Other Backward Class (OBC) status in Haryana has opened up the debate on the relationship between economic process and changing caste realities in India. This mobilization of Jats and their concerns have to be located in the twin processes initiated in 1991 - market reforms following economic liberalization, and the Mandal commission recommending the implementation of reservation for the OBCs. The liberalization of the market demanded a certain level of education and social skills. Some castes with social capital inherited these skills which others lacked. Since networks play a major role in accessing modern sectors,caste works as a premium. The second outcome of the economic liberalization is that it broke the structural link between agriculture and non-agriculture. Over the years, agriculture has lost its relevance as a driver of economic growth. As agriculture declined, the caste groups that are traditionally associated with agriculture like the Jats have lost their economic power. On the other hand, the Mandal have facilitated the relative mobility of lower castes such as the OBCs and Dalits through reservations in government jobs and education. Both these economic and political mobility of lower castes have challenged conventional caste equations and generated anxieties among the Jats. This paper discusses the nature of the response of the Jats to this crisis, of how there was a change in their discourse from one of domination – a claim of a glorious past and Kshatriya status – to a discourse of deprivation, and a claim on the OBC status in order to get better access to education and jobs.

About Speaker

Kalaiyarasan A. is Assistant Professor at the Institute for Studies in Industrial Development, New Delhi.  His main areas of interest are in the social and political dimensions of Industrialization. His research focuses on the role of social institutions and political regimes in economic outcomes in India and how they influence and characterize the larger dynamics of development at sub-national level. He previously worked at National Institute of Labour Economic Research and Development, the Research Wing of the Planning Commission, Government of India, on policies related to employment generation and skill development. He received his doctoral degree in Development Economics from Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. His doctoral thesis titled, “Industrialization in Tamil Nadu: Understanding Regional and Socio–Economic Disparities," explored the role of social institutions and political regimes in shaping economic process in the state of Tamil Nadu